Celtic Gods and Goddesses
line
GoddessRATIS (Anglo-Celtic) Goddess of protective fortification and boundaries. Her name means "of the fortress". She is remembered today because the Britons set up shrines to her at various places along the Roman fortification known as Hadrian's Wall which ran the east-west length of northern England for the purpose of keeping raiding Scottish warriors on their own side of the border. Ratis' most notable worship sites sere near the towns of Birdoswald and Chesters.
deity hr
GoddessRHIANNON (Welsh, Cornish) "The Great Queen"; Goddess of birds and horses. Enchantments, fertility, and the Underworld. She rides a swift white horse. Rhiannon is believed to be the Welsh counterpart of Gaulish horse goddess Epona. Her son, Pryderi, succeeded his father Pwyll as the ruler of Dyfed and of the otherworld.

She is the wife of Pwyll, and mother of Pryderi. Unjustly accused of destroying Her newborn son (who had been kidnapped by a nameless Fiend; see above), She is compelled to take on the role of a horse, until Her son is unexpectedly returned to her. She is also considered as an aspect of the Irish Morrigan

Rhiannon's original name is thought to be Rigatona (Gaulish), also meaning "great queen", indicating a much higher status in the Celtic pantheon than she enjoys today. Some sources say she was once a Sun Goddess.

In her guise as a death Goddess, Rhiannon could sing sweetly enough to lure all those in hearing to their deaths, and therefore she may be related to Germanic stories of lake and river faeries who sang seductively to lure sailors and fishermen to their deaths. In magick and ritual Rhiannon can aid in overcoming enemies, exercising patience, working magick, moon rituals and enhancing dream work.
deity hr
godROBIN GOODFELLOW (Anglo-Celtic) Also known as Puck. He is a mischievous imp who delights in pranks and hazings. Boastful and immature, at his best he resembles a kind of Tom Sawyer/Huck Finn figure, if you can imagine those two endowed with supernatural powers. His name is an Anglicized version of the Irish Puca, Cymric Pwcca, ancient Celtic hobgoblinish spirits having the same general attributes as the later figure.

Though often thought of today as the goat-footed faery king of the woodlands, Robin was probably once another name for the Horned God, and he is believed to be the source for the folk-tales about the forest-dwelling hero Robin Hood.

Also see Cernunnos
deity hr
GoddessROSMERTA (Anglo-Celtic, Gaul) Rosmerta was a Goddess of both Celtic and Roman Gaul. After Rome conquered the region, Rosmerta was adopted into the local Roman pantheon where she became a consort of their God Mercury. In Roman depictions of her she carries a caduceus wand, an indication that she was adept in the healing arts. Her name means "great provider".

In Celtic England her images are confused, and she is considered to be a Goddess of either water of the sun indicating that she may have been associated with hot springs. She was often depicted carrying a basket of fruit or cornucopia which indicates that she was also worshipped as a fertility Goddess at one point.
deity hr
godRUDIOBUS (Romano-Celtic, Gaul) Probably a horse God. Known from an inscription at Neuby-en-Sullias that includes a depiction of a stallion.
deity hr
GoddessSCATHACH (Irish, Scottish) Also Scathach nUanaind, Schathath Buanand ("victorious"), and Skatha. Her name means "Shadow"; "Shade"; "The Shadowy One"; "She Who Strikes Fear". She lived on the Isle of Shadow in the Hebrides where she had a school to which the greatest of Ireland's warriors came to be trained. She was famous for invincible battle methods such as the magickal leap and the battle yell., a technique also employed effectively by the Native Americans (the war whoop), and by the Confederate soldiers (the rebel yell) during the American Civil War.

Cuchulain, possibly Ireland's greatest warrior hero, was one of her students, as were many other Red Branch warriors. Like the Lady of the Lake in the Arthurian sagas, she bestowed on her most deserving pupil a magickal sword. Scathach did not train women because of a Celtic belief which stated that only women could teach men effective battle skills, and only men could teach them to women.

She was the Underworld Goddess of the Land of Scath; Dark Goddess; goddess in the Destroyer aspect. Patroness of black-smiths, healing, magic, prophecy, martial arts.
deity hr
GoddessSCOTA (Irish, Scottish) She was probably once a mother Goddess in her native Egypt, but her myth and origins today are shadowy. The general agreement is that she was the daughter of the Pharaoh Cingris, after which the stories about her diverge, some even merging her with the Christian biblical figures. In most tales she is the mother of Amergin the bard, though she is said to be the wife of both Milesius and Niul. She died in the Milesian invasion and is thought to be buried near a dolmen (a primitive stone altar) in County Kerry, Ireland.

The name Scoti, derived from her own, was once a designation for the Irish, and later became the name of the Scottish people.
deity hr
godSEGOMO (Continental) A war God also called by the name Cocidius. His image is always seen with birds of prey such as the hawk or falcon.
deity hr
GoddessSEQUANA (Anglo-Celtic, Continental) Earth Goddess who lived beneath the rivers of Britain, and could only be seen if the rivers were drained or low from drought. She was sometimes depicted as a duck, and at her festival offerings were tossed into the rivers. Originally she was a continental deity who ruled the Seine Valley, the river Seine is named after her.
deity hr
GoddessSHONEY (Scottish, Irish, Manx) Though the Shoney are now thought to be sea faeries living off the coast of Scotland and Northern Ireland, they were once personified as a single God of the North Sea. Documentation exists showing that local fishermen continued to offer libations of ale to him as late as the nineteenth century.
deity hr
GoddessSIRONA (Breton, Gaul, Continental) Also spelled Dirona. Her names means "star". She was a Goddess of the many beneficial hot spring sin southern France from which her few extant legends came. She was also a sky Goddess, probably a deity of the sun.

She was the mother of Borvo, who usurped her position in patriarchal times.

A Continental Goddess of healing and fertility.
deity hr
godSMERTRIOS (Gaul) A God of War and the tutelary deity of the Trevari. Allegedly the subject of a votive monument that depicts a bearded god holding a snake.
deity hr
GoddessSOMHLTH (Irish, Scottish, Manx) A deity with no corporeal incarnation, a representation of pure masculine, divine energy.
deity hr
GoddessSOUCANA (Gallic, Romano-Celtic)Also Souconna. Guardian and namesake of the river Sone. Known chiefly from inscription at Chalon.
deity hr
GoddessSTINE BHEAG O'TARBAT (Scottish) This old woman, who lived near Tarbat Ness, was said to be very powerful, with special mastery over the weather. As her story came into modern times she was reduced to a vindictive old hag or baneful faery who used her powers for spite rather than assistance. In the modern stories abut her, those who come to her for help address her as "mother". It is reasonable to assume that she was once a Scottish Pagan leader, perhaps a highly placed Druidess, or even a local mother Goddess.
deity hr
godSUCELLOS (Britain, Gaul) Also spelled Sucellus. "The God of the Mallet"; "Good Striker"; Father God; Sky god. Bearded; similar to Jupiter. Associated with dogs and carried a mallet or hammer. God of abundance; success, strength, authority, protection, regeneration, dogs, trees, ravens, protector against a sudden turn of fortune. God of agriculture and forests, and of alcoholic beverages (he is often shown carrying a beer barrel suspended from a pole), and a hammer god. His consort is Nantosvelta.

He carries a long handled hammer and a cup or dish that is arguably the equal of the Irish Celtic Dagda's cauldron. He is known principally from the valleys of the Rhone and Sane and is often coupled in art and votive inscriptions with the river Goddess Nantosuelta. In a least two instances, Unterseebach (Lower Rhone) and Varheely (Romania), Sucellos is accompanied by a raven and a three-headed dog, suggested the Roman guardian of the underworld Cerberus, and a link with funerary practices. Sucellos also has associations with the woodland God Silvanus, suggesting a fertility connotation and, in France, is associated both with springs and with dogs and snakes, which suggest healing and rejuvenating powers (dogs were more generally linked with the Roman healing God Aesculapius than with death).
deity hr
GoddessSULIS (Romano-Celtic) Goddess of healing (she presided over sacred, healing springs). She was called Brigantia by the Britons; and later Saint Brighid (after Christianity).

She is also a deity concerned with knowledge and prophecy. The tutelary Goddess of the thermal waters at Bath, England, she is closely linked with the Roman Goddess Minerva.
deity hr
Joelle

[Celtic Art] [Celtic History] [Celtic Deities] [Celtic Tree Calendar] [Celtic Traditions] [Wiccan Beliefs] [Wiccan Tools] [Wiccan Texts] [Wiccan Traditions] [Solitary/Coven] [Sabbats] [Esbats] [Pagan Traditions] [Candle Magick] [Clip Art] [Desktop Themes] [Circle of Fairies] [Herb Garden] [WWotW] [Celtic Links] [Wiccan/Pagan Links] [Favorite Links] [Home] [Webrings] [Site Map] [Reading List] [Guestbook]

deity hr